Book Review: Persepolis; a memoir of lost and found

Pune: The book is written by Marjane Satrapi, in the form of an autobiographical comic book. It is also the first every Iranian comic book ever published, it was designed and written by Marjane Herself. It was published in four volumes but later was merged into one.
veilThe story starts in 1980, post one year of revolution, a great-granddaughter of the last emperor of Iran, Marjane Satrapi tells a clever and moving story which is humorous and emotional at the same time. A child of the revolution, martyrs, and political instability gives us inside out of home life and public life in Iran.

A Persian Philosophy of resignation,’ When a big wave comes, lower your head and let it pass.’ Persepolis tell you a story of families, of people, of a nation who fought for freedom and got fear, instability, and the constant struggle for rights.

The book is a masterclass, the story is told with the help of comic strip format, which not only keeps you engaged but gives you space to understand the characters and events.The story of Marjane Satrapi or Marji starts when she is 10 years old, and Islamic Revolution has completed one year which overthrew the shah.

And from secular and modern Iran, it became a fundamentalist and capitalist regime, when veils were made mandatory, schools become one gender based, and every action by people was monitored by Revolution Guards. Where Satrapi wants to be a Prophet, loves punk rock, and is rebellious.

PERSEPOLIS

And from secular and modern Iran, it became a fundamentalist and capitalist regime, when veils were made mandatory, schools become one gender based, moral police, and governmental propaganda in schools, and every action by people was monitored by Revolution Guards.

Satrapi has cleverly channelised the thought of a child in the book, where her imagination, thoughts, and actions revolve around the changes in her life, the suffering to living a private and public life differently.

In the time where people were disappearing due to connections Shah, bombing by Iraq, and rebellious nature with l, Satrapi was sent to another country at the age of 14 to get a better education and life like many families and kids to keep them away from cruelties of war.

Persepolis book 2

But the sudden detachment from her beloved country and a culture shock made it difficult to survive. She returns home to find her lost self, in the country which is home despite every forbidden social liberty. She meets the new generation of Iran’s, who has found a way to live their kind of life, who has made peace with the changes and are hopeful that things will become better in time to come.

She meets the new generation of Iran’s, who has found a way to live their kind of life, who has made peace with the changes, are hopeful that things will become better in time to come, and have found their happiness in the difference of Public and Private life. In Private, they partied, danced, and enjoyed drinking, whereas publicly they are religious, rule-bound, and conscious.FotorCreated

She quotes.’ I learned something essential; we can only fee sorry for ourselves when out misfortunes are still supportable.’, which signifies the youth growing up in the regime.

Satrapi-PersepolisWith finally making peace with all her struggles, accepting her country as it is, with the comfort of her thoughts and courage, she leaves the country again but as an adult, who is not fleeing a war but leaving with her own choice.

This book not only teaches you to embrace what you have but also to dream, imagine, and live. It teaches you to appreciate the freedom to learn, to create, and to love what is around you.

For me, this book would be a realization of the fact that to understand one’s world, to create conclusions, and to learn about yourself, all you need is courage, self-awareness, education, and of course books.

And as she says, ‘one must educate oneself’.

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